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Pap Screening and Cervical Cancer Prevention

Nearly 70% of cervical cancer cases are caused by two strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV). For more information on the HPV Vaccine and the immunization schedule , contact Public Health.   

Regular screening to detect abnormal changes in the cells of your cervix at an early stage can help prevent cervical cancer, or improve your chance for a complete recovery.


How do I get screened for cervical cancer?
Cervical cancer screening is done by a Pap test. Having a regular Pap test is the best way you can protect yourself from cervical cancer. There are no symptoms to let you know a Pap test is needed.


What is a Pap test?
A Pap test is a procedure that removes a small sample of cells from the cervix. These cells are examined under a microscope and monitored for any abnormal changes. Pap tests make sure these changes are not missed and cervical cancer does not develop. Pap testing is done by a family physician, a nurse practitioner, or a registered nurse.


When should I have a Pap test?
The current Pap screening guidelines recommend women should have a Pap test if they:

  • are 21-65 years of age and have been sexually active (including intercourse, as well as oral or touch with a partner’s genital area, male or female);
  • are over 65 years of age and have not had three negative tests in the last 10 years.

More evidence is now available demonstrating that abnormal cervical cells in young women are more often able to go away on their own without treatment or follow-up procedures, and that some procedures, when performed at a young age, could cause potential harm. If you are of higher risk or not sure if you should wait until age 21, consult with your health care provider.


Three ladies - Pap Screening and Cervical Cancer PreventionWhen can I stop having Pap tests?
You do not need to have regular Pap tests performed if you:

  • have never been sexually active;
  • have had your cervix removed during hysterectomy; or
  • are over 65 years of age and have had three negative tests in the last 10 years.

 
How often should I be tested?
In general, women of average risk should have a regular Pap test every two years.

If you have ever been treated for abnormal cells (cervical dysplasia) or cancer of the cervix, you should be screened every year.

If you have a weakened immune system, you should be screened every year.  You may have a weakened immune system if you are:

  • a transplant recipient; or
  • being treated with chemotherapy or taking long-term corticosteroids; or
  • HIV/AIDS positive.


What if I had a hysterectomy?
If you’ve had a hysterectomy it’s important to know if you still have your cervix, or if it was removed. This will help determine if further Pap tests are required. It is recommended you consult with your health care provider to determine what screening is right for you, based on your history.

If you have had a sub-total hysterectomy (cervix remains), you should continue to have a regular Pap test every two years.

If you have had a total hysterectomy (cervix removed) and have not been treated for cervical dysplasia or cancer of the cervix, you do not need to continue to have regular Pap tests. 

If you have had a total hysterectomy (cervix removed) and have had treatment for cervical dysplasia or cancer of the cervix, you should be screened every year.


What if I had the HPV Vaccine?
It is recommended that all women who are sexually active, whether they have had the HPV vaccine or not, be screened regularly.


Should I have a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Test?
Testing for HPV is a similar procedure to the Pap test. If you are a woman over the age of 30, you may consider this type of test; however, it would be at your own cost. We recommend that you consult with your health care provider regarding this test. Until there is further scientific evidence for the benefits of HPV testing and management of a positive HPV result, Health PEI is not recommending screening with the use of HPV tests at this time.


How do I get a Pap test to be screened for cervical cancer?
You can begin the screening process by:

  1. Calling your family physician or nurse practitioner to set up an appointment; or
  2. Submitting an online Appointment Request Form to the provincial Cervical Cancer Screening Service; or
  3. Calling 1-888-561-2233 to book an appointment for a Pap test at a Cervical Cancer Screening Clinic in your community. See below screening clinic dates:

Cervical Cancer Screening Clinics 2016    
Community/Address
Screening Clinic Dates
Tignish   
Tignish Health Centre
254 Phillips Street
June 7
September 13
November 8
O’Leary   
O'Leary Health Centre
14 MacKinnon Drive
June 7
September 20
October 18
November 22
Lennox Island   
Lennox Island Health Centre
15 Eagle Feather Trail
 
Summerside
Harbourside Health Centre
243 Heather Moyse Drive
June 7, 21
July 5, 19
August 2, 16, 30
September 13, 27
October 11, 25
November 8, 22
December 6
Charlottetown   
Sherwood Medical Centre
15 Brackley Point Road
Tuesday's 8:15 am - 3:30 pm
June 7, 14, 21, 28
June 14, Evening Clinic 4:15 pm - 7:00 pm
July 5, 12, 19, 26
August 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
September 6, 13, 20, 27
October 4, 11, 18, 25
November 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
December 6, 13, 20, 27
Montague   
Montague Health Centre
407 MacIntyre Avenue
July 26
September 27
Souris   
Eastern Kings Health Centre
7 Green Street
June 7
September 6


How do I contact the provincial Cervical Cancer Screening Service?
To book an appointment at one of the cervical cancer screening clinics:

Telephone:  (902) 368-5901
Toll-free:  1-888-561-2233
Fax:  (902) 368-6936


Where can I find more information?

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